Breaking LONDON Southall

A serving Metropolitan Police Service officer has sadly died after he tested positive for Covid-19 earlier this week

Screenshot 2021 01 22 at 08.03.07
Screenshot 2021 01 22 at 08.03.07

 

PC Michael Warren, aged 37, who was attached to the Met’s Territorial Support Group (TSG), died on Tuesday morning (19 January).

PC Warren joined the Met in February 2005 and performed a number of different policing roles. In his last four years he served as a TSG officer based at North East Area.

Due to being classed as vulnerable during the pandemic, PC Warren had been shielding at home, however, his ambition to support his team and frontline colleagues was not deterred. PC Warren would log on remotely every day to offer any assistance he could to his team.

PC Warren is survived by his parents Pauline and Alan, his partner Vicky and his daughter Eden (8) and son Joseph (5).

Met Taskforce Chief Superintendent Karen Findlay, said: “Mike was a lovely, genuine and hard-working police officer. To lose his life at the young age of 37 is truly heart-breaking and my deepest thoughts and sympathies are with all who knew him, particularly his parents Pauline and Alan, his partner Vicky and their lovely children.

“Mike was a devoted father and a good police officer. Across the Met and the TSG he was a friend to many of his colleagues. He had a dry sense of humour and was often the heart and soul of a team in a TSG carrier. Outside of work, he was a passionate Spurs fan and dedicated his spare time to one of his life’s other passions, motorbikes.

“Mike’s passion for policing and serving the communities of London was unwavering, even after he started shielding at home so he could focus on his health given the current risk of Covid-19. He regularly went above and beyond to support his TSG colleagues virtually, doing anything he could to add value – our policing family has lost a kind, genuine and enthusiastic police officer.

“He was very much motivated to return to frontline duties, and he regularly spoke about how he looked forwarded to putting his uniform back on and going out on patrol with his colleagues. His death is a bitterly stark and upsetting reminder of the human impact of this virus, I know we will all miss him dearly.”